Marine Biologist in Training
27 March 2013 @ 3:31 PM
1 year ago via ilovethewhales (originally versificais)
24 May 2012 @ 4:15 PM
Now thats what I call determination. :)

Now thats what I call determination. :)

2 years ago
24 May 2012 @ 4:12 PM
Now thats what I calll determination. :)

Now thats what I calll determination. :)

2 years ago
23 May 2012 @ 11:47 PM
planet-earthh:

Aurora Borealis by Norseman1968 on Flickr.
2 years ago via d-evoti0n-deactivated20121209 (originally planet-earthh)
23 May 2012 @ 11:46 PM

thetruthaboutlolita:

People aren’t the only ones at risk from eating mercury-contaminated fish, since coal-burning power plants have liberally sprinkled the toxic metal across the earth’s waters.  But it appears that captive dolphins have a little less to worry about in that regard than their wild counterparts.

A new study by researchers from Johns Hopkins University and the National Aquarium in Baltimore found that the aquarium’s captive bottlenose dolphins have lower levels of mercury in their bodies than wild dolphins tested off the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of Florida.

Mercury is a potent neurotoxin. High mercury levels have been linked to liver abnormalities in stranded Atlantic bottlenose dolphins and with infectious diseases in stranded harbor porpoises.

Differences in contamination levels likely stem from differences in diet, researchers said. The aquarium dolphins were fed capelin and herring caught in North Atlantic waters off Newfoundland and New England, where mercury in the water is relatively low.  Much higher mercury levels were measured in wild dolphins tested off Indian River and Sarasota in Florida, where in-state power plants have been blamed for higher mercury levels in the environment.

The study, published in a recent issue of Science of the Total Environment, found a smaller difference in mercury contamination between the aquarium dolphins and animals tested off the coast of South Carolina. Researchers cautioned that the findings are limited by the relativley small number of dolphins tested, just seven from the Baltimore facility.

“This is just one snapshot, one puzzle piece,” said Edward Bouwer, co-author of the study and chairman of JHU’s geography and environmental engineering departments. He and the other researchers, including lead author Yong Seok Hong of JHU, would like to compare mercury levels in other aquarium dolphin populations with wild counterparts.

This comes at no surprise, but a good article to show anti-caps and say, “I told you so.”

(Source: scetaceans)

2 years ago via ilovethewhales (originally scetaceans)
23 May 2012 @ 11:43 PM

(Source: p1kachu)

2 years ago via d-evoti0n-deactivated20121209 (originally p1kachu)
23 May 2012 @ 11:41 PM
ilovethewhales:

endkillerwhalecaptivity:

Calypso -Captured in 1969I came across a scientific paper where it says after capture she refused to eat so her pool was emptied and she was gagged and force fed every day for five weeks. Afterwards she had to be treated for “nervous ticks” (I wonder why).Calypso died just a year later.Photo courtesy of Orcahome.de 

love the picture, hate the story. :(

ilovethewhales:

endkillerwhalecaptivity:

Calypso -Captured in 1969

I came across a scientific paper where it says after capture she refused to eat so her pool was emptied and she was gagged and force fed every day for five weeks. Afterwards she had to be treated for “nervous ticks” (I wonder why).

Calypso died just a year later.

Photo courtesy of Orcahome.de 

love the picture, hate the story. :(

2 years ago via ilovethewhales (originally endkillerwhalecaptivity)
23 May 2012 @ 11:41 PM
amor-vincit-0mnia:

Splash the orca by auntie rain on Flickr.
2 years ago via ilovethewhales (originally thepapercranesociety)
23 May 2012 @ 11:40 PM
2 years ago via ilovethewhales (originally explorecreatewonder)
23 May 2012 @ 11:40 PM
2 years ago via d-evoti0n-deactivated20121209 (originally gilchi-deactivated20120710)